• Alberto Bonfiglio

    Alberto Bonfiglio—PhD student in Robotics at Oregon State University—is a renaissance man. A quick look at his hobbies reveals his varied and diverse interests: fencing, motorcycle riding, flying, horseback riding, playing bass and guitar, scuba diving, competing in Spartan races, or simply pushing his sons Connor Tiberius Kamea and Anakin Jean-Luc Kekoa along hiking trails with his wife Danielle and their two dogs.

  • Leanne Giordono

    Leanne Giordono has dedicated her life and career to serving others. Whether volunteering in AmeriCorps or PeaceCorps, starting her own business, raising three children, getting a Master's in Public Affairs from Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School, or pursuing a Ph.D. in public policy at Oregon State University as a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, Leanne brings her unique vision to everything she does.

  • Stephanie Lange

    Growing up in East Germany and watching the Berlin Wall fall as a child, Stephanie Lange has always seen opportunities beyond her immediate surroundings. While pursuing a tri-national Bachelor of Engineering, Stephanie attended the University of Strasbourg in France; the University of Applied Sciences and Arts in Northwestern Switzerland; and the University of Applied Sciences in Karlsruhe, Germany, where she also received a Masters of Engineering in 2007.

  • Francisco Guerrero

    Francisco Guerrero, a Ph.D. student in sustainable forest management, is passionate about spreading ideas, communicating his research, and bridging gaps between fields. He studied aquatic biology when pursuing his bachelor’s degree in his hometown of Santa Marta in Colombia before discovering ecohydrology — which looks at the relationships between water and the other elements within their ecosystems — and then moved into forestry for his Ph.D.

  • Featured Award Recipient - Jafra Thomas

    Jafra Thomas, Kinesiology student and recipient of the Diversity Advancement Pipeline Fellowship, brings his enthusiasm to OSU.

  • Featured Award Recipient - Jessica Andrade

    Though Jessica Andrade grew up in the deserts of Southern California, this master's student in Fisheries Science at OSU developed an abiding passion for the ocean. “When I was growing up, my parents would often take me to the beach. I'm a first-generation college student, and my parents fostered in me a love for learning and an appreciation for nature. I'm grateful for them—it was never 'if' I was going to college, but 'when.'” For Jessica, getting a graduate degree was a logical next step after completing her undergraduate degree in Marine Science at the University of San Diego.

  • Featured Award Recipient - Jesse Donaldson

    Jesse Donaldson is not an undiscovered talent. Before coming to Oregon State University for its increasingly prestigious Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program, he spent years writing a novel, The More They Disappear, which will be published in 2015. He received a scholarship from the Breadloaf Writer’s Conference and a nonfiction prize from the literary journal Crazyhorse for his essay exploring the similarities between baseball and religious fervor. He is currently working on a compilation of Kentucky myths organized by county.

  • Featured Award Recipient - Jeremy Hoffman

    Conversations around global climate change range from acerbic to chilling. Jeremy Hoffman is contributing scientific rigor to the conversation by researching the way Earth’s climate has changed in the distant past.

  • Featured Award Recipient - Matthew Adams

    The Romans used concrete extensively thousands of years ago, and surprisingly, that seemingly solid concrete poured in ancient Rome is still reacting today. “It’s still changing, almost like it’s alive,” Matthew Adams explains. There is still a lot we don’t know about the way concrete reacts over the long term with the addition of different materials, and he aims to find out.

  • Featured Award Recipient - Ralph Lampman

    As a researcher for the Yakama Nation Fisheries, Ralph Lampman studies lampreys, a prehistoric, eel-like fish that looks scary, but is important to Native American culture and regional ecosystems.

  • Featured Award Recipient - Jennifer Thomas

    Jennifer Thomas didn’t start out to be an oceanographer. The graduate student from Virginia Beach, Va., was a music major focusing on trumpet performance at the University of Iowa. But in the summer before her senior year, she discovered that she had a rare bone disorder that might require regular surgeries on her jaw. Those surgeries carried the risk of permanent damage to her embouchure — the way that facial muscles and lips shape around the mouthpiece of an instrument.

  • Featured Award Recipient - Adriana Mendoza

    Adriana Mendoza recognizes there aren’t a lot of women in mathematics in academia, but as she pursues her Ph.D., she’s also working with the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics and other organizations to bring more diversity to the field. “Ever since I was a kid, I wanted to help my peers,” she says. “At OSU, I’m getting to do that.”

  • Featured Award Recipient - Adonara Mucek

    Most first-year graduate students start out taking advanced classes and narrowing down their research focus. Not Adonara Mucek. She spent the first term of her Ph.D. program at Oregon State working in Indonesia with her advisor, Shanaka (Shan) de Silva.

  • Featured Award Recipient - Blair Paulik

    Blair Paulik could have attended graduate school with a full scholarship at Duke University, but she chose Oregon State after being deeply impressed by the history of the Environmental and Molecular Toxicology department.

  • Featured Award Recipient - Lauren Brooks

    "Who pooped in the water?" is a question usually reserved for public pools or stand-up comedy.

    Lauren Brooks is devoting a great deal of her time and energy studying a problem that is much more serious and widespread than some may believe. Her research originally stemmed from a concern that there was not always an effective way to differentiate between sources of fecal contamination.